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Issued: 5/21/2015

The Wireline Competition Bureau (Bureau) seeks comment on the attached proposed eligible services list (ESL) for the schools and libraries universal support mechanism (more commonly known as the E-rate program) for funding year 2016. We invite stakeholders to comment on any aspect of the proposed ESL, and particularly welcome comments based on applicants’ and other interested parties’ experience with using the ESLs for recent funding years.

  •  E-mpa Reply Comments 07/06/2015
  •  E-Rate Central Reply Comments 07/02/2015
  •  SECA Ex Parte Reply Comments 07/08/2015
Released Date:
05/21/2015
Comment Date:
06/22/2015
Reply Comment Date:
07/06/2015
Issued: 5/1/2015

The Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC) hereby submits the federal Universal Service Support Mechanisms fund size and administrative cost projections for the third quarter of calendar year 2015 (3Q2015), in accordance with Section 54.709 of the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC or Commission) rules.

Issued: 4/27/2015

On April 15, after a multi-year investigation arising from events in 2004-2008, the Chief of the Telecommunications Access Policy Division (TAPD) of the FCC's Wireline Competition Bureau issued an Order denying appeals by an E-rate service provider and four Massachusetts school districts of a USAC decision that found numerous flagrant violations of the E-rate rules in the provider's dealings with the schools. These included violations of the program's competitive bidding and non-discount share rules. The Order found that the provider, Achieve Telecom Network, "devised a scheme to pass through, control, and direct the disbursement of funds... to cover the Schools' non-discount share of the costs of Achieve's services, in violation of the E-rate program rules," and that "as a result of this scheme, Achieve essentially provided 'free services' to the Schools."

Issued: 4/20/2015

Since the dawn of the internet, there's been much talk about the digital divide – the gap between those with access to the internet and those without. But what about the "homework gap"?